Posted in Budget, Flying on Miles, Hotel, Travel

Survey on American travel credit cards

Travel credit cards are rewards cards that help users earn free travel, achieve elite member status with hotels and airlines and enjoy many other travel-related perks. Although travel credit cards can often be used for cash back too, consumers receive better value when using them to collect and redeem points for travel.

Travel credit cards fall into one of three types: airline cards, hotel cards and general travel cards. A co-branded airline or hotel credit card enters you into a specific brand’s loyalty membership club and rewards all types of spending, however the points you earn can only be redeemed toward that single brand and its partners. General travel cards also reward all types of spending, at a lower, flat rate, but the points you earn can be redeemed with a variety of airline and hotel loyalty programs, based on the partnerships secured by the card issuer.

2017 Survey: More Than Half of Travel Rewards Cardholders Carry a Monthly Balance

U.S. News surveyed 1,278 travel credit card users to understand the benefits and drawbacks of owning one. While the vast majority of respondents have redeemed lucrative rewards in the last year, many cardholders are not aware of their annual fee or how to take advantage of their card benefits. Additionally, more than half of travel credit card users have carried a balance on their card in the last year, potentially negating the rewards they have earned.  Thirty-three percent of respondents earned more than $500 in rewards in the last year.  The most popular redemption options included free domestic flights, followed by cash back, followed by free nights at a hotel. Free international flights were the least commonly redeemed. More than half of travel credit cardholders surveyed carried a monthly balance in the last year.

Since travel rewards credit cards tend to have higher-than-average interest rates on purchases, carrying a balance has the potential to cost you more than any rewards you earn. Travel credit card expert Daraius Dubash of millionmilesecrets.com recommends that people carrying credit card debt should probably opt instead for a zero percent APR card and focus on eliminating their credit debt before trying to earn travel rewards.

Sign-up bonuses are one way that cardholders end up carrying a balance, says Joe Cortez, senior writer for frugaltravelguy.com. “In a way [a sign-up bonus] is almost a trap to try to get you to put a balance on the card up-front.” Forty-three percent of consumers surveyed said they qualified for their card’s sign-up bonus.

 

It’s also critical that consumers be aware of annual fees. Most respondents knew what their card’s annual fee was, while 17 percent of respondents didn’t know.

Nearly half of travel rewards cardholders don’t take advantage of cardholder benefits.  Ninety-six percent of respondents redeemed at least some rewards in the last year, but 48 percent of respondents did not take advantage of common cardholders benefits such as airport lounge access, trip cancellation/delay insurance, free checked bags when flying, auto rental insurance and priority boarding when flying.

How Travel Credit Cards Work

Travel rewards cards help users save money on travel expenses, like on airfare, hotel and transportation spending. Travel credit cards benefit repeat customers, because the more you spend, the more savings (or benefits) you receive.

Travel rewards cards offer higher earning rates for travel spending in particular, and may can be cashed in for highly discounted or free flights and hotel stays, free or reduced baggage fees, priority boarding and other perks. Some cards may not even require any points at all to take advantage of those perks, but they may carry an annual fee to offset those costs to the issuer.

Travel credit cards often come with lucrative sign-up bonuses with the best cards offering as many as 100,000 points to new members who hit a minimum spending amount within the first few months.

Like other premium rewards cards, travel cards are generally known to carry more restrictions and fees than the average credit card. For this reason, travel cards are not as beneficial for the occasional traveler.

There are three basic types of travel credit cards: airline, hotel and general travel.

 

Airline credit cards

Airlines partner with credit card companies to offer co-branded travel rewards credit cards that earn the most miles when used for flights on that particular airline and spending with affiliate partners, typically double or triple the miles. Cardholders still earn miles for day-to-day purchases (with a few exceptions like cash advances and purchases of prepaid cards), only at a lower rate, typically one point per dollar. You can redeem earned miles with that airline or its affiliates.

Benefits: Perks and spending rewards

Airline cards can deliver a cheaper, more comfortable flying experience. Benefits often include free or reduced baggage fees, priority boarding, complimentary or discounted access to the airport lounge and discounts on in-flight purchases.

But airline cards can also save you money by offering sizable sign-up bonuses, waived foreign transaction fees and double or triple miles earned on airline and affiliate purchases.

 

Hotel credit cards

Hotel credit cards are most valuable when used to book accommodations with that particular hotel chain. Unlike airline cards, it’s not uncommon to earn five points per dollar spent with that brand, with other travel purchases earning fewer points and all other purchases earning the least. Points have to be redeemed through that brand or its partners.

Benefits: Free nights and special status

Hotel credit cards work best for loyal guests of one particular hotel chain or group. Free nights are the most valuable benefit, and most hotel cards provide users with an easier path toward elite status, which delivers perks like guaranteed room availability, membership discounts, priority check-in, and complimentary upgrades. As with airline credit cards, one-time sign-up bonuses are common if you spend a minimum amount within the first few months.

Some hotel cards charge an annual fee that’s waived during the first year, but those that do typically don’t charge foreign transaction fees. Many hotel cards provide various forms of travel insurance, like lost baggage protection, trip delay reimbursement, emergency assistance and car rental insurance coverage. Some hotel rewards programs let you transfer your points to their airline partners.

 

General travel credit cards

General travel credit cards are not tied to any particular travel brand and offer the flexibility to redeem through their own travel portals or transfer points to partners to redeem for cruises, hotel packages, rental cars and cruises, among other options. Purchases typically carry a flat reward rate, but points can be redeemed from a broad selection of travel brands and sometimes for nontravel rewards.

Benefits: Flexibility and value

General travel cards are inherently more flexible than airline or hotel credit cards, which is a big plus for travelers who aren’t loyal to any particular brand or who travel to destinations with fewer options for hotels or airports. Cardholders can worry less about blackout dates or travel restrictions because they’re not tied to a sole provider.

Points can sometimes be transferred to other loyalty programs. However, points don’t transfer equally with all partners and the exchange rates do vary; in some cases you get get the best redemption value by transferring points to partners. It’s important to review your card’s reward charts to better calculate the value of transferring your points with partners.

The ability to also redeem general travel card points toward statement credits or cash back makes this type of card particularly attractive to users who prioritize flexibility.

Benefits and Drawbacks of Travel Rewards Credit Cards

For the right consumer, travel credit cards can make a lot of financial sense, but it’s important to understand the pros and cons.

Benefits

Better point valuations and redemptions: Travel-related spending with travel credit cards accrues points and miles faster than general rewards credit cards, and when those miles are redeemed for travel, they have potential to deliver better ratios than other rewards like cash back or statement credits. Points can be used to book free nights at hotels or for free flights.

Travel perks: Many travel credit cards also offer perks like free checked bags, priority boarding, concierge services and travel protection and assistance.

No foreign transaction fees: A foreign transaction fee is a surcharge on every purchase made on a credit card outside the U.S. If your itinerary takes you overseas, a travel credit card that carries no foreign transaction fees helps you avoid that added cost, which is typically 3 percent of the purchase price.

Drawbacks

High costs: Travel cards’ purchase interest rates (APRs) fall on the higher end of the scale for all credit cards, and the credit score needed to secure them starts in the upper 600s. Qualifying credit scores on the lower end of the spectrum will, in turn, result in higher APRs.

Top travel cards charge annual fees that require high amounts of travel or other spending to offset them via rewards. Similarly, sign-up bonuses may encourage you to spend more just to qualify for them.

“I think that many consumers are very excited about the points without considering how much they’re going to spend in actual interest at the end of the day,” Cortez says. To avoid running a high balance on the card, Cortez explains that a savvy consumer will look at his or her budget in light of the required minimum spending amount to qualify for a sign-up bonus and determine a plan to earn the points in a way that complements their lifestyle.

Restrictions: Travel credit cards can also cost you time. Some cards require lots of planning or working with customer service to navigate blackout dates, limited seat availability or confusing terms and conditions. Depending on the card, there can also be restrictions on earning miles, including caps and expiration dates. And, of course, bonus points from airline and hotel cards are restricted to redemption only with that brand or qualifying partners.

Emily Jablon, co-founder at Million Mile Secrets, points out that for an expensive or long-distance trip, it may be worth the added cost to enlist the help of an award-booking service. For a fee ranging from $75 to $250 per traveler, services like Cranky Concierge and AwardAdvocate can help you find and book the lowest fares for award travel and answer any questions you may have about your trip.

Choosing the Best Travel Credit Card

Is a travel credit card right for you?

Make sure you meet these requirements before signing up for a travel rewards credit card.

  • You travel frequently. If you don’t consistently spend on airfare, hotels or other travel expenses, consider a cash back credit card instead. They have fewer limitations on redemption and might save you the cost of an annual fee.
  • You have a good credit score. You have the best chances of being approved for a travel credit card if you have a FICO score of at least 700.
  • You pay off your balance each month. Because travel credit cards have higher-than-average APRs, you should only get a travel card if you can pay off your balance each month.

To find a travel card that meets your needs, evaluate each card using the following criteria:

  1. Pick the right rewards program for you.
  2. Calculate earning potential.
  3. Factor in sign-up bonuses.
  4. Calculate redemption value.
  5. Subtract annual fees.
  6. Understand travel benefits.
  7. Avoid foreign transaction fees.

1. Pick the right rewards program for you.

Your travel credit card will work either in conjunction with the loyalty program of an airline or hotel chain or with the rewards program of the bank or credit card company that backs it. Each program has its benefits as well as unique terms and conditions for earning, redeeming and transferring points.

Loyalty airline programs

For some travelers, their loyalty to any particular airline lasts only as long as that airline offers the cheapest flights. But frequent flyers are often willing to forgo initial cost savings in exchange for benefits down the road. Which airline’s program works best for you will depend on several factors regarding the loyalty program and the airline itself.

Popular airline programs:

Loyalty hotel programs

When you look for a hotel, do you prioritize value or luxury? The answer will help you determine which hotel rewards program is right for you. As with airline loyalty programs, your earned points may only be eligible for redemption with one hotel chain and its affiliate partners. Some hotel rewards programs have partnerships with other brands, such as Marriott Rewards, which allows members to redeem and earn points with The Ritz-Carlton Rewards program.

Popular hotel rewards programs:

General points program

Using a general travel credit card enters you into the rewards program for the bank or credit card company that backs it. While you will have access to the broader redemption platform for that provider’s network of credit cards, you’ll still receive the best value by redeeming for travel through the platform or using the platform to receive statement credits for travel purchases made on the card.

Maximizing your rewards means matching your goals and habits with the appropriate type of travel rewards program. If you want deluxe benefits that come with elite membership status, an airline or hotel card is the way to go.

However, if you don’t travel as often and want maximum flexibility when you do, as well as a broader range of earnings categories, a general travel card is usually the smartest choice for your first travel card. Frequent flyers often find that adding a second, co-branded loyalty card to their wallet makes sense once they’ve established a favorite airline or hotel chain.

 

2. Calculate earning potential.

Travel cards earn rewards at different rates for spending in different categories, so you have to analyze your spending habits to determine which card will help you maximize your points. A good travel card will have a range of purchases that qualify as travel spending. These purchases can include:

  • flights
  • stays at hotels, motels, timeshares and campgrounds
  • car rentals
  • cruises
  • trains
  • buses, taxis, limousines and ride-hailing companies like Uber and Lyft
  • parking lots and garages
  • bridge and highway tolls
  • meals and other non-lodging expenses at hotels

Depending on the type of card, these purchases can earn between 1.5 and seven points. The highest points tend to come with hotel cards, while airline cards typically award double to triple miles for flight purchases. All other purchases, often referred to as everyday spending, typically earn between one and two points per dollar spent.

 

3. Factor in sign-up bonuses.

The most lucrative travel cards offer bonus points to those who meet a certain level of spending by a specified date, usually within three to six months. These bonuses can be worth hundreds of dollars. For example, the Southwest Airlines Rapid Rewards card offers 50,000 points when you spend $2,000 in the first three months, and the BankAmericard Travel Rewards card offers 20,000 points when you spend $1,000 in the first three months.

 

4. Calculate redemption value.

Every travel card carries a rate at which points or miles are awarded. However, what those points are worth to you depends on the value you derive from redeeming them, as well as your preferences and priorities.

For general travel cards, point valuation is simple math: your number of points multiplied by the redemption rate, often a rate of 1 cent to 1 point. On the surface, award travel with airlines or hotels is also straightforward: The typical cost of a flight or room is divided by the number of miles you need to book an award flight or stay.

But airlines and hotels frequently adjust the price of award travel based on award level, award availability, time, destination/location, fare/hotel class, demand and other factors. All of these changes will affect the value of your miles, making valuation for airlines in particular “extremely complicated,” according to Dubash. “You’ll see estimates all over the place.” He and Cortez both cite 2 cents per mile as a general standard for miles with the major airlines, while the value of miles with smaller airlines like Southwest and JetBlue may fluctuate higher or lower than 2 cents.

Other factors that affect the value of your rewards program include:

  • whether there are fees for checked bags, foreign transactions, etc.
  • whether your points can be transferred to another loyalty program and at what ratio
  • how easy it is accrue and redeem points and whether you face blackout dates, seat restrictions or other limitations
  • the quality of perks available to you once you reach top-tier elite status

5. Subtract annual fees.

Credit card companies entice new users by waiving the annual fee for the first year, which typically ranges from $40 to $95, although it can go as high as $450 per year. Once the fee kicks in, be sure you’re earning enough rewards or enjoying the other card benefits to compensate for it. For example, the Barclaycard Arrival Plus World Elite MasterCard’s $89 annual fee activates in the second year, but you might easily save that amount through the card’s discounts on car rentals, vacation packages, charter flights or flights with one of its airline partners.

There are also excellent cards on the market that don’t carry an annual fee. For example, the Discover it Miles card is a no-fee card that doubles users’ rewards at the end of the first year of use, has no foreign transaction fees and offers a flat 1.5 percent rewards rate on all purchases, including nontravel expenses.

 

6. Understand travel benefits.

Travel benefits can be practical tools, discounted pricing or luxe perks. Common benefits include no foreign transaction fees, access to 24/7 concierge or customer service lines, free baggage and travel insurance. For example, the Chase Sapphire Preferred card comes with trip cancellation/interruption insurance, lost luggage reimbursement, car rental theft and collision coverage, baggage delay insurance, trip delay reimbursement, 24/7 customer service and more.

The Southwest Airlines Rapid Rewards Premier credit card and Business credit card provide A-list status users with priority check-in and boarding, free same-day standby and dedicated customer service. Members of the top two tiers can get free in-flight Wi-Fi and free flights for a friend every time they fly.

The Marriott Rewards Premier credit card comes with zero foreign transaction fees and a free night stay every year after your account anniversary. Members at the introductory level get free in-room internet, while the upper tiers promise lounge access and breakfast, free room upgrades, guaranteed room availability, late checkout, elite customer service lines and arrival gifts.

 

7. Avoid foreign transaction fees.

The best travel cards don’t charge a foreign transaction fee, which is typically 2 to 3 percent on every purchase. Since these fees can be greater than any rewards you earn, frequent overseas travelers will want to make this card feature a top priority.

 

Strategies to Maximize Travel Rewards

Pick the right first travel card.

When you’re first starting out with travel cards, select one with a general miles program that gives you the flexibility to earn rewards for all spending and redeem with the largest variety of brands. Unless you spend large amounts on travel expenses with a particular brand, airline and hotel cards offer less flexibility and savings.

Combine a general travel card with a cobranded or loyalty card.

Used in tandem with a general travel card, an airline or hotel card makes sense for frequent travelers who are comfortable committing to one particular travel brand. This combination allows you to use the cobranded card to earn bonus points on the cobranded airline/hotel spending and use the general travel card to still earn bonus points in non-travel spending categories. You want to make sure your general travel card is allowed to transfer points to the cobranded card, for maximum value.

For example, Chase Sapphire Preferred works well with the Southwest Airlines Rapid Rewards program. You can earn Chase Ultimate Rewards by spending with the Chase Sapphire Preferred card and transfer them to Southwest to either book with miles, or earn double miles by booking with your Southwest Rapid Rewards card. Cortez says he’s a fan of this card combination particularly for casual travelers, as Southwest offers 100 percent award seating availability and doesn’t charge a fixed amount of miles for flights, allowing travelers to find some good bargains on their tickets.

For a general travel/hotel combo, the Hyatt Credit Card also works well with the Chase Sapphire Preferred card. You can earn points with either card and also transfer your Ultimate Rewards into the World of Hyatt rewards program.

Maximizing Your Card Benefits Abroad

Knowing how your travel credit card works and what benefits and protections it offers (or doesn’t offer) can help you solve some of the problems that may arise when you’re abroad.

Avoid foreign transaction fees.

If you’re not sure if your card has foreign transaction fees, check with your bank when you notify them of your upcoming trip. You can also verify with them that your card has EMV smart chip technology, which is the most compatible with foreign merchants and provides the best security.

Avoid dynamic currency conversion.

Many foreign merchants let you choose to be charged in local currency or to pay with dollars through dynamic currency conversion. You should always opt for local currency, as the exchange rate will likely be poor and/or have a fee tacked on top. It’s always good to have cash on-hand regardless in case a store or restaurant won’t accept your card.

Know who to contact in an emergency.

Signature Visa cardholders have free access to a 24/7 benefits administrator who can provide medical referrals, contact loved ones and arrange for payments. Likewise, Citibank cardmembers can receive round-the-clock referrals and other help with medical and legal emergencies.

Some programs, like Visa Signature and World Elite MasterCard, provide 24/7 global services for card-related needs and expedited card replacement, and Visa gives an emergency cash advance or Western Union wire transfer within two hours of approval by your bank.

For common travel medical emergencies, an officer from the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate can help connect you with treatment services, inform loved ones and facilitate the transfer of funds, if necessary. All medical expenses will be your responsibility, however.

Take advantage of travel insurance.

MasterCard and Visa both include travel protections through their cards, as well as travel insurance for an additional cost. World Elite MasterCard offers members international travel accident and medical expenses coverage up to $1 million each, plus trip inconvenience protection and luggage protection.

Visa Signature’s plan offers cardholders and their immediate family members Common Carrier Travel Accident Insurance (for accidents involving your airline, train or cruise ship) up to $500,000 and 24-Hour Travel Accident Insurance for injury, dismemberment or loss of life up to $100,000.

Only 15 percent of credit cards offer travel cancellation insurance, and due to the lack of medical coverage and routine exceptions to Common Carrier protection, the benefits are limited. You may want to opt for third-party travel insurance for fuller coverage.

Protect your rental car.

Your personal car insurance policy probably will not cover foreign travel, so you’ll need to purchase auto insurance in your destination country, preferably at an equivalent level of coverage to what you carry at home.

Travel cards with Visa Signature and World Elite MasterCard benefits offer auto rental collision damage waivers that provide reimbursement over and above any primary insurance you have for towing, loss of use, theft and/or damage to the car up to the full cash value of most rental vehicles booked using that card.

There are restrictions, however, including the country of travel, type of vehicle, age of the vehicle and length of the rental period. And you’ll be required to refuse the collision damage waiver at the car rental counter. Third-party liability, personal accident and personal property coverage will not be included with your card’s coverage, which is why TripAdvisor Travel Advocate Wendy Perrin advises carefully considering which of your credit cards will give you the best coverage (and not result in an increase in your insurance premium).

Be sure to file your claim as soon as possible because time limits are strictly enforced, and have as much documentation as you can. This includes copies of the accident report, rental agreement and receipt, repair estimate, police report and plenty of photos.

Additionally, in some countries, you will need an International Driving Permit. An IDP can be purchased from AAA or the American Automobile Touring Alliance for a $20 fee with a valid driver’s license, two passport pictures and a completed application.

 

Get help with your lost luggage.

Many travel rewards credit cards offer benefits to help you deal with lost luggage. The Lost Luggage Locator Service of Visa Signature can assist with the airline’s claim process or arrange for replacement items to be shipped to you. Both Visa Signature and World Elite MasterCard guarantee users reimbursement for lost or delayed baggage of $100 a day for three days.

 

Airline liability can be complicated for international travel. Your rights are laid out in either the Warsaw Convention or the Montreal Convention, depending on which country you’re traveling to. Frommer’s has a good breakdown of what to do in the event of lost luggage under either scenario, plus best practices for avoiding lost bags in the first place.

 

Contact: Anna Gonzales – Outreach Associate working with U.S. News & World Report

 

 

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Posted in Budget, Cheap Airline, Europe, Travel

RyanAir – An airline that nickels and dimes customers

Dear Travelers:

You like low cost airlines, so do we.  They say you get what you pay for and that is the case with Ryan Air; you only get a seat on an airplane that takes you from A to B.

It is well known that if you choose your seats or request extra leg room, you pay extra. Wanna check a baggage? Not free either but a carry-on luggage is.

Checking-in online at home and printing your own boarding passes are no big deal anymore but what happens when you send senior citizens (my parents) on a trip who have no smart phones with internet connection, additionally we did not have internet at the beach house in Malta and obviously we don’t travel with printers.  Well, apparently not everybody can check-in online and print boarding passes on the way back!! We were on a remote location about an hour from the capital.

My flight from Malta to Washington was early in the morning, my parents had to fly back to Budapest at 7:10 PM with RyanAir.  Before I left I gave them the flight confirmation but obviously I could not check them in online due to the lack of internet and printer.  RyanAir did not accept the flight confirmation (payment for 2 seats), apparently they penalize travelers for not checking-in online and printing their own boarding passes.  The penalty is almost as much as the airfare so they basically re-sell you the same seats! I paid $60 per person for the ticket and the penalty at the airport was 50 Euro (roughly $54) per person. The penalty is per segment, so if you need to transfer somewhere the 50 Euro doubles up per person!

My elderly parents speak no English, they just kept showing the document I gave them, which was the flight confirmation.  I gifted these tickets to my parents to be able to attend a family reunion so they had no record of the purchase; I had the email confirmation.  My mom panicked at the counter thinking they won’t be able to fly back home and of course she had no way to reach me since I was in the air, flying back home. She unwillingly agreed to pay whatever RyanAir demanded with the foreign transaction fees.  I can’t say RyanAir is kind and fair, their conversion rate between the Euro and the Hungarian Forint was the lowest I have ever seen; they gained some money on the purchase transaction too!  Mom usually never travels with her bank card abroad (she never needs money when she is with me) but luckily my sister was cautious and put it in her valet.  Imagine what could have happened if they did not have their bank card with them because they did not have cash on them either.  They might have gotten stranded at the Malta airport!

After I returned to the USA I opened a dispute with RyanAir but basically I wasted my time.  They said I could have checked them in online 60 days in advance if I prepaid for seats but you are on your own if you don’t have seats selected (like I do).  This is their way to enforce travelers to buy seats!  When you don’t have a seat selected you can only check-in 4 days in advance so if you take a week long vacation (like we did), may the Power be with you.  You need to find a library (if there is any near you) or if you stay in a hotel, perhaps you can ask for help from the receptionist or concierge unless they have a business room.  If you rent an apartment or a beach house with no internet and printer (like I did), just prepare yourself to fork out extra cash at the airport.

Their customer service sucks the same way the airline does.  You can only send them a complaint via an online form but you are limited to type 1000 characters.  They will respond within a few days but you can’t reply to their emails anymore.  I chatted with an agent online who suggested me to send a new complaint. Good god!

Before you choose RyanAir, please take a look at the other airlines as well, the other fare might cost more money but check all additional fees and if they throw you any peanuts onboard or not.  If RyanAir could charge you for using their bathroom they would, perhaps Number 2 would cost you more 😉

Photo: Ryanair.com

Posted in Budget, Dental Tourism, Europe, Travel

Dental Tourism

Choosing a good dentist is as important as choosing a good surgeon and if appearance is important to you so is dental hygiene. If you have a dental insurance most likely it does not cover oral surgeries, braces and cosmetic treatments and if it does, it may just be a small percentage of the total cost which is still sky high.  High premiums have small deductibles, small premiums have a high deductible so either way you are paying way too much for dental care, feeding the pockets of your insurance company and dentist.

What if I told you that it does not have to be expensive and you could combine it with a vacation?! You are not going to fly across the ocean for a check-up and cleaning but if you need major work than consider getting it done outside of the United States.  You will save a lot even with the air tickets! If you have family and friends living abroad you may have a free place to stay but if you can arrange your dental appointment during a business trip, you get your airfare and hotel for free! If you don’t know anybody abroad and don’t travel for business, you can still do it, it is so easy!

What is dental tourism? It is a network of dental clinics that specialize on foreign patients arriving to a country for major dental work, staying for a short time and traveling between dental visits.  You are NOT going to be bed-ridden after dental treatments so basically you can do anything from sightseeing to rafting as long as you take care of your teeth and follow doctor orders. There is no consultation because they only need to look at your medical records and X-ray online and by the time you get to the clinic the dental supplies are already delivered and the staff is prepped for surgery.  These high end clinics don’t do check-up and cleanings or take walk-in clients, which means that you never have to wait just because a local walked in with an emergency.  These clinics are considered to be expensive for locals; only cater to foreigners and schedule appointments months in advance. Whatever you need from implants to bone transplants and skin grafts, from braces to crowns and bridges, you can get it done. Yes, even braces, they can put it on for you, just get the monthly adjustments done back home. So, let’s do this step by step.

First, pick a country you would like to visit and google “dental tourism”.  You are going to get a list of dental clinics, read their reviews and select about 4-5 of them.  These clinics have a professional website featuring their dentists with credentials and listing their services and fees but for specific information and availability you need to send them an email first. If you don’t hear back from them within the next few business days, eliminate them. Having a good communication and customer service is essential when you are a foreign patient. European clinics speak multiple languages so if you speak one of the major languages, you will be fine.

Once you made contact with a dental clinic, you will have to email your dental records and X-rays then choose between materials and treatment options in order to estimate a total price.  Keep in mind that you will have to pay with their currency but they accept all major credit cards. Use a credit card that does not have a foreign transaction fee and awards you with either miles/points or a cash rebate.  I do not suggest you taking a large amount of cash with you abroad for safety reasons.

Based on your needs they are going to assign you a dentist, tell you how long you must stay in the country and explain you how the appointments will be spread out during that time.  It is advised to schedule your treatment soon after you arrive because you need to leave time for a follow-up visit or in case something goes wrong.

If all looks good and you agree to the plan, go ahead and purchase your air ticket.  You already know how long you need to stay abroad so choose your travel dates, and if you want to travel a bit leave some extra time for that.  The sooner you want to leave the more expensive it will get so my recommendation is to pick your travel dates within the next 3 months to get a good deal for air travel.  This blog is only about dental tourism but if you need tips on how to get good deals, please read my other blogs on www.travelbigspendsmall.com.

When you have your tickets, notify your dentist about your arrival date, flight number and the time of arrival because a driver will pick you up at the airport (his fee is incorporated into the total cost).  He will be in charge of transporting you between the airport, the clinic and your hotel or accommodation.  The clinics usually offer a few hotels to stay and normally can get you a lower room rate than a travel agency would simply because they work with the hotels directly and buy in bulk.  If you need a hotel for your stay that is going to be an extra cost but the driver is included for your convenience either way.

We have tried dental tourism in Hungary since we have friends and family there so we saved on hotel.  It worked out perfectly fine, the dental work looks great, can’t be happier.  We got an estimate here in the USA for $25K but by getting the work done in Hungary we saved 75% including airfare (two air travel 6 months apart).  As a matter of fact we got more jobs done for less than whatever was proposed for $25K.  Consider flying to Budapest, enjoy what the city has to offer, visit a thermal bath or take a trip to Prague or Vienna in between the dental treatments, they are just 3-4 hours away.

Image: TrustedHealthProducts.com

Posted in Budget, Nature, Travel, Tucked away

How to do Iceland on a budget

Iceland is one of the cheapest destinations to get to but one of the most expensive locations for tourists to visit.  You can easily find air tickets for $99 from Boston or Baltimore to Iceland one way (plus tax and luggage fees) with low cost airlines.

Before I get started you need to understand that the tourist season is relatively short on Iceland, visitors concentrate in Reykjavik from spring to fall, only the brave ones venture out in the winter.  The hotels get sold out very quickly and are very expensive.  Reykjavik is a very small city comparing to other capitals in the world, downtown only consists of one street running from Hallgrimskrikja Church to Old Harbor and pretty much that is it.  Parking is very limited and you can’t access certain sections of downtown with a car; it is going to be hard to find free parking around there.  If there is no event, try parking at the church and walk your way down to the port.

If you are not into pub crawling and hate crowded and overpriced hotels like I do, then book an apartment in the suburbs and park for free.  Suburb in Iceland only means a 10-15 minute drive to downtown Reykjavik so it wasnt a big deal for me knowing how much money we saved.  Whether you are traveling alone or with family members or other couples, you may want to consider booking an apartment on Airbnb which is what I did.

We went to Iceland in the month of June, which is considered to be peak season, hotel rooms were starting from $240/night with no breakfast and paid parking. My two-bedroom apartment cost $52 a night (for the 4 of us) with utilities and cleaning fee included.  The building itself was nothing to write about, the apartment had no panoramic views but was completely renovated and furnished with typical nordic furniture; the host left us a lot of fresh food in the fridge and cabinets.  We had a grill on the balcony and a private parking so we never had to fight for space or feed the meter.

Restaurants are very expensive as well, a plate of food with meat or fish ranges from $42 to $80 and portions are small. I have been to over 4o countries but never seen anything like it before.  Cafeterias were a bit cheaper but come on!  A family of 4 could break the bank in a week so we did grocery shopping and cooked for ourselves.   We only sat in coffee houses twice and treated ourselves with a slice of dessert (got free water) and I paid $60 each time for a family of 4.

The cheapest grocery store is called Bonus, you may want to remember that because there is a price difference between them.  Take a walk and look around well, don’t grab the first item that comes in your sight because they tend to display special items in the middle of the shelves and isles. I grabbed a whole leg of lamb but found the same meat under a different brand just 2 fridges away for half the price.

Most of the produce and crops are imported since nothing grows on Iceland for two reasons: First, the climate does not allow it; since summer is short and relatively cold, the vegetables only have 3 months to grow from the day they plant it till harvest. Second, there is no good soil for cultivation, the land is nothing but rocks and ashes from the lava.  There are 21 active volcanos and hundreds of geysers, hot springs and waterfalls. Imagine the country like Marsh with only moss and green grass surrounded by an ocean. Very spectacular actually but no agriculture. I heard on a cooking class that wheat survives on certain parts of Iceland.

Tap water is completely safe to drink, Icelandic water is one of the cleanest and purest on earth however it does have a little smell and taste which is due to its high mineral content.  The shower water smells the same way. If it does not bother go for it, you save money on bottled water, if it does, get a case of water.

Organized tours cost an arm and a leg.  Initially I thought they are taking advantage of tourists then we realized that they have to make enough money from spring to fall to survive winter with no (or minimal) income.  If you must pay for a tour, there are no local coupons to find anywhere online (trust me,  I tried). You can do two things: pay the tour operators directly and skip the retailers or book your tour on an American webpage that allows you to use a coupon. I used Viator and saved 10%.

Your must book your ticket to the Blue Lagoon at least a 3-4 days in advance. There are no discounts and the price is not fixed.  During busy hours and based on demand they increase the entrance fee; however, if you choose to go in the morning or evening hours, you are paying the lowest price which is 50 Euro in the summer and 40 Euro in the winter which includes a locker and a silica musk.  If you take a towel, slippers and a bathrope with you, you save some bucks on rental fees.  There are cheaper hot springs but in all honesty, Blue Lagoon is the most unique and biggest on Iceland, one of the world’s Seven Wonders.

Your best bet is to rent a car and drive around.  Rental cars are pricy, economy cars with limited miles start from $80 plus insurance.  If you drive less than 100 km a day you are fine but if you exceed it, you will pay per kilometer.  Note: The Keflavik International airport is already around 50 km from Reykjavik and distances between the main attractions are pretty big  as well so map your road trip and calculate the distances. Since I book everything way in advance and do a good research online, I managed to find a local provider for about $50 a day with unlimited miles, it is called Hasso Rent a Car.  Gasoline is around $2 a liter which equals to about $8 a gallon. (You are still better off driving comparing to paying for organized tours for multiple people).  There is no toll on the south side of Iceland. It is safe to drive around, most roads are paved and in great condition, just watch out for narrow bridges and give way to incoming traffic; pull over if you have to.   Watch out for cattle and herds crossing roads, the speed limit is slower than anywhere else. Keep an eye on the weather because it can change rapidly and unexpectedly, flash floods are pretty common over there.  You are not allowed to drive on unpaved surfaces and through rivers (or running water) with an economy car, the fine is huge!